Bioscope

bioscope

Maarten Isaäk De Heer

Berlin 2017 • Lentikulardruck

A small town by the sea. While fields reach out into the scenic horizon, bru­tal events are unfolding in the town center, on the market place, and inside the buildings. A horde of gnomes has invaded the place, maltreating the animal inhabitants of the town in a cruel manner. Plants that have grown as big as houses create a rather dystopian and dark ambience, contrasting the bright and vivid images.

With „Bioscope“, Maarten Isaäk de Heer has crafted an intense and lively scene full of little details and interactions. The scene is drawn in the style of ancient dutch painters such as Pieter Bruegel the Elder (ca. 1525 – 1569) and Hieronymus Bosch (ca. 1450 – 1516) who are well known for their large paintings of busy scenes. While moving around the painting, the depicted scenes set in motion as well. Flames burst out of a burning house, maggots creep on the floor and the gnomes carry on with their demonic game. The illusion of movement is created via the technique chosen by the artist to transfer his painting from the digital to the analogue world: lenticular printing. In this printing technique, a raster of tiny and almost invisible lenticular lenses is applied onto an image. In this case, the image consists of animation frames that are split and separated into very thin lines. Depending on the viewer’s perspective, you´ll see another frame of the animation.
„Bioscope“ is a unique artwork following the tradition of the paintings of Old Dutch Masters. In order to confirm this, the only digital copy of the printing master was destroyed by the artist during the first presen­tation of the work in the summer of 2017 at Animafest Zagreb. Using a hydraulic press, the harddrive was broken into pieces. Only the animated painting remains. Or would it be more fitting to call it a painted animation? This question reveals the artist‘s passion for interdiscipli­nary work, for discovering the boundaries of classic animated filmmaking which is the focal point throughout all his artistic work.

www.maartenisaakdeheer.com